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December 20th, 2010 - Staff

Get Healthy is proud to introduce a redesign of its website. We’ve packed it full of all the great content you’re used to, plus the site will be the new home for engaging news stories about health care in Northwest Indiana.

Please bookmark our new URL here.

With access to the leading health experts right here in the region, Get Healthy offers readers a local perspective on what’s best for your health, including nutrition, fitness, mental health and environmental health. Along with the magazine, email newsletter and Facebook page, Get Healthy offers an array of valuable content that is both relevant and proactive.

The easy-to-navigate Get Healthy site will have even more beneficial content in the near future—including blogs and expert columns—so stay tuned. We’re here for you 24/7, so check it out, and let us hear from you!

Crown Point native writes book about surviving breast cancer

December 13th, 2010 - By Jane Ammeson

Sarah Demmon conquered her fear of water by joining Indy Survivoars, a group of breast cancer survivors that race dragon boats. The group's mission is to provide breast cancer survivors with a strong message of hope. (Photograph provided.)

Sarah Demmon conquered her fear of water by joining Indy Survivoars, a group of breast cancer survivors that race dragon boats. The group's mission is to provide breast cancer survivors with a strong message of hope. (Photograph provided.)

For Sarah Demmon, the toughest time during her bout with breast cancer was the interim period between the initial diagnosis and getting the test results back which would tell her how far the cancer had spread.

“It’s very emotional,” says Demmon, a 1988 graduate of Crown Point High School who works as senior research scientist at a pharmaceutical company in Indianapolis. “You don’t know what to do and what to expect.”

As a breast cancer survivor, Demmon decided she wanted to help other women who were diagnosed with the disease. “My whole intent is to help in a very frank and honest way,” says Demmon, who has written Thanks for the Mammaries: A Breast Cancer Survivor’s Story (Strategic Publishing 2010; $11). “I have a dry sense of humor and can be sarcastic.”

Book chronicles Merrillville family’s journey with autism

December 6th, 2010 - By Carrie Rodovich

whataboutpaul

When Jad Terrebonne’s son, Paul, was diagnosed with autism more than two decades ago, he felt like someone had taken a hammer and shattered all his dreams.

“It was a shock to us,” he said. “I grew up in a ‘boys world’ and had that dream of hunting and fishing with him, like I did with my father. I really struggled with that for a long time.”

Jad Terrebonne recently self–published What About Paul? How I Gave Up My Broken Dreams detailing his family’s journey with Paul, now 27. Terrebonne’s wife, Rachelle, and his daughter, Amy Terrebonne Luarca, also contributed chapters to the book.The book is available through amazon.com.

After the initial surprise of Paul’s diagnosis wore off, Terrebonne said the family made it a priority to help Paul get all the services he needed. “I said I was going to fight to see that he could reach all of his potential,” he said.

Series gives consumers skinny on food choices

December 4th, 2010 - By Michael Hill, Associated Press
The books in the <em>Eat This, Not That!</em> series by David Zinczenko continue to offer sometimes surprising restaurant and supermarket tips. (AP Photo/Rodale Books)

The books in the Eat This, Not That! series by David Zinczenko continue to offer sometimes surprising restaurant and supermarket tips. (AP Photo/Rodale Books)

Looks like Americans really do like being told what to eat.

Three years after first telling readers to pick McNuggets over Filet-O-Fish and the low-carb slice over the deep dish pizza, books in the Eat This, Not That! series continue to offer sometimes surprising restaurant and supermarket tips.

The latest entries: the 2011 edition of Eat This, Not That! and a second Cook This, Not That! cookbook offers lower-calorie versions of restaurant favorites like burgers and calzones. That’s 10 books and more than 6 million copies in a series that still sells like hotcakes (which readers are advised to eat with fruit on top, not sugary supermarket syrup).

The Eat This concept is simple and clever. Compare similar foods—maybe two sandwiches from the same chain, or two canned soups or chocolate bars—and list the calories, fat, and salt in each. The healthier choice is tagged “Eat This” and the one clogged with bad stuff gets a “Not That!”

Filed under: Nutrition. Tags: , , , .

‘Our Bodies, Ourselves’ turns 40

November 7th, 2010 - By Molly Woulfe

ourbodiesourselves

For 50-somethings up, the first book of women’s health care written by women is a social and cultural touchstone. Penned in 1970, Simon & Schuster’s expanded 1973 version whisked female sexuality out of the closet. No subject was taboo: anatomy, birth control, orgasms, abortion, even pelvic exams were outlined in graphic detail. Free love era or not, nice girls didn’t look Down There. Not until this comprehensive manual described how to locate one’s cervix.

Elizabeth Crown was a college junior when the feminist classic hit campuses. She and classmates passed around “someone’s sister’s or aunt’s or mother’s copy.” “We were blown away by the amount of information,” said Crown, 60, former spokeswoman for the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern. “It was accessible. It freely discussed things we tried to figure out among ourselves, but no one had told us.” Looking back, Crown credits the book for demystifying sex “in a good way,” freeing her, in turn, to be candid with her own daughter. “It was liberating,” said Crown, now director of communications at Stanford Cancer Center.

What Women Want

October 30th, 2010 - By Bonnie McGrath and Erica Rose

whatwomenwant

For most women, implementing a healthier lifestyle is as much a mental overhaul as it is physical. You need motivation to work out, courage to ask your doctor embarrassing questions, and fortitude to go through life’s more difficult phases (read: menopause). We talked with local experts about these obstacles, which can be overcome with grace and ease.

Read all of the articles here:

» Health or Vanity
» Questions You’re Afraid To Ask
» Navigating the Change

Navigating ‘The Change’

October 25th, 2010 - By Bonnie McGrath
Drs. Lovera and David Miller (Photograph courtesy of Drs. Lovera and David Miller.)

Drs. Lovera and David Miller (Photograph courtesy of Drs. Lovera and David Miller.)

It’s not often that doctors will tell you that you can help yourself better than they can. But two LaPorte doctors, Dr. Lovera and Dr. David Miller, a married couple who are experts on the topic of menopause, will tell you just that—when it comes to women facing “the change.”

Dr. Lovera Miller, who started practicing obstetrics and gynecology in 1977—several years before her husband entered medical school and became an anesthesiologist—used to come home with all kinds of stories about women coping with menopause. The stories made an impression on the couple, and somewhere in the back of their minds, through their years of medical practice and raising two daughters, they planned to write about it.

Ideas for what to do with summer’s bounty

July 4th, 2010 - By Michele Kayal, For The Associated Press
<em>Cooking from the Garden</em> by Ruth Lively: Right about now farmers market devotees start coming home with more than they know what to do with, simply because it’s all so beautiful. But an unusually good crop of produce-centered cookbooks offers inventive ways to use the bounty to its best advantage.

Cooking from the Garden by Ruth Lively: Right about now farmers market devotees start coming home with more than they know what to do with, simply because it’s all so beautiful. But an unusually good crop of produce-centered cookbooks offers inventive ways to use the bounty to its best advantage.

Right about now farmers market devotees start coming home with more than they know what to do with, simply because it’s all so beautiful.

But an unusually good crop of produce-centered cookbooks offers inventive ways to use the bounty to its best advantage.

Susie Middleton’s Fast, Fresh and Green injects your cooking with a little “Huah!!” and offers a strategy for decoding and deploying a greater variety of vegetables.

Built around foundation recipes for eight different cooking techniques such as grilling, roasting and sauteing, the book teaches home cooks how to handle different vegetables, and then offers suggestions for enlivening them. Roasted cauliflower gets a Moroccan feel from orange zest and olives and the simple sassy slaw strikes a Southwest note with lime, cilantro and Serrano peppers (technique: No Cooking). Great book for vegephobics or people stuck in a steamed broccoli rut.

Cooking from the Garden by Ruth Lively features more than 200 recipes that aim to move the greens from your backyard to your table with minimal fuss. With the big, blocky look of an elementary school textbook, the book offers quick, comfy fare like tomatoes in shallot-flavored cream (cooking time about 5 minutes), stir-fried shrimp with asparagus, and chicken pot pie with rosemary biscuits. Home gardeners will appreciate the section on turning your piles of borage and lemon verbena into herbal teas.

Filed under: Nutrition. Tags: , , .

Author writes book, creates group to help care for daughter in event of his death

June 21st, 2010 - By Jane Ammeson

< Dr. Sanjay Gupta interviews Bruce Feiler for his documentary <em>A Sanjay Gupta, MD Special: Dads for My Daughters.</em>

A successful writer, happily married and the father of adorable three year old twins, Bruce Feiler’s life was going very well. But when his doctor told him that he had a 7-inch cancerous tumor on his femur, suddenly Feiler was faced with the angst of wondering how his daughters’ lives would be without him and without a dad.

A few days later, Feiler, author of nine books including Walking the Bible and writer/presenter of the PBS miniseries Walking the Bible, decided how to give his daughters a father if he were gone.

Make that six fathers.

Celebrities weigh in on struggles

June 19th, 2010 - By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times (MCT)
Kirstie Alley in <em>Kirstie Alley's Big Life</em>. (Photograph by Brian Doben.)

Kirstie Alley in Kirstie Alley's Big Life. (Photograph by Brian Doben.)

On the A&E show Kirstie Alley’s Big Life, the star sits in bed, working on her laptop and talking to her kids about her weight. “Does it upset you that I’m fat?” she asks them. “No,” they both reply, the end of the word going up slightly the way it does in uncomfortable situations.

“Slightly?” she says. “It’s never embarrassing?”

The kids—17-year-old son True and 15-year-old daughter Lillie—look down and say no again.

“You’re not—” True begins, and Alley finishes his sentence: “—circus fat?”

Welcome to the era of the fat celebrity. No longer is it shameful, shocking or a career killer for the famous to make weight struggles the centerpiece of their lives. In fact, they’re making money off of it.

And we can’t get enough.

Feeding the soul

April 11th, 2010 - By Jane Ammeson

Food can heal and now there are several cookbooks that help accomplish this process by offering recipes for those struggling with a variety of maladies including cancer, gluten intolerance and allergies to such foods as dairy, eggs and nuts.

“Ginger is one of your best friends during chemo, both for its flavor, which can spark even the most jaded taste buds, and for its tummy-soothing properties,” says Rebecca Katz, author of The Cancer Fighting Kitchen, a finalist in the Health & Special Diet category of the prestigious IACP Awards, as well as One Bite at a Time: Nourishing Recipes for Cancer Survivors and Their Friends, both published by Celestial Arts. “A lot of people think store-bought ginger ale will do the trick, but the actual ginger content in most commercial varieties is minimal. Plus, you often get a whole host of other garbage—can you say high fructose corn syrup?—that you’d be better off without.”

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