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December 20th, 2010 - Staff

Get Healthy is proud to introduce a redesign of its website. We’ve packed it full of all the great content you’re used to, plus the site will be the new home for engaging news stories about health care in Northwest Indiana.

Please bookmark our new URL here.

With access to the leading health experts right here in the region, Get Healthy offers readers a local perspective on what’s best for your health, including nutrition, fitness, mental health and environmental health. Along with the magazine, email newsletter and Facebook page, Get Healthy offers an array of valuable content that is both relevant and proactive.

The easy-to-navigate Get Healthy site will have even more beneficial content in the near future—including blogs and expert columns—so stay tuned. We’re here for you 24/7, so check it out, and let us hear from you!

How to succeed with home fitness gear

December 16th, 2010 - By Marilynn Preston, The Bryan Times

At some point—perhaps when I was busy planting organic basil in my window box—shopping became our nation’s No. 1 patriotic activity. It’s the economy, goofball: When U.S. consumer spending is up, our economy is growing. When we stay home, grill turkey burgers and play Monopoly in comfy old jeans, we’re just not doing our part.

OK. I get it. So this week I’m encouraging you to join the tens of thousands of consumers who spend an estimated $4 billion annually on home exercise equipment. There are huge end-of-year sales now on treadmills, elliptical cross trainers and, my personal favorite, the stationary bicycle. Do it for Uncle Sam. Better yet, do it to improve your health, drop some pounds and reclaim your energy without a shot of Red Bull.

Filed under: Fitness. Tags: , .

Healthy behavior contagious among women, study shows

December 14th, 2010 - By Katherine Marley, Medill News Service

Say you’re out to lunch with girlfriends, and craving a burger but everyone orders a salad—would you order a salad too? A study published last in BioMed Central’s open access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity suggests you would.

Kylie Ball, associate professor at Deakin University’s School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, worked with a team of researchers to survey 3,610 Australian women. The women, ages 18-46, were asked to rate how much they agreed with statements like “I often see other people walking in my neighborhood” and “Lots of women I know eat fast food often.”

Filed under: Mental Health. Tags: , , .

Crown Point native writes book about surviving breast cancer

December 13th, 2010 - By Jane Ammeson

Sarah Demmon conquered her fear of water by joining Indy Survivoars, a group of breast cancer survivors that race dragon boats. The group's mission is to provide breast cancer survivors with a strong message of hope. (Photograph provided.)

Sarah Demmon conquered her fear of water by joining Indy Survivoars, a group of breast cancer survivors that race dragon boats. The group's mission is to provide breast cancer survivors with a strong message of hope. (Photograph provided.)

For Sarah Demmon, the toughest time during her bout with breast cancer was the interim period between the initial diagnosis and getting the test results back which would tell her how far the cancer had spread.

“It’s very emotional,” says Demmon, a 1988 graduate of Crown Point High School who works as senior research scientist at a pharmaceutical company in Indianapolis. “You don’t know what to do and what to expect.”

As a breast cancer survivor, Demmon decided she wanted to help other women who were diagnosed with the disease. “My whole intent is to help in a very frank and honest way,” says Demmon, who has written Thanks for the Mammaries: A Breast Cancer Survivor’s Story (Strategic Publishing 2010; $11). “I have a dry sense of humor and can be sarcastic.”

Ho Ho Noooo—’Tis the season to be flabby

December 4th, 2010 - By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz, Chicago Tribune (MCT)

Santa

Put down the peppermint-cream-cheese brownie. Step away from the candy-cane-crusted chocolate martini.

Between holiday treats at the office and post-work party dessert bonanzas—not to mention booze, booze, booze—risk is high that you’re beginning to look a lot like Santa.

The good news is that you can indulge in holiday festivities without gaining weight, as long as you mind your metabolism.

Two experts on nutrition and fitness offer advice for navigating caloric minefields and maximizing your metabolism on a typical day of the holiday season, when co-workers go on baking sprees and exercise takes a back seat to cocktail parties.

Ben Greenfield is a Seattle-based nutritionist and physical trainer (bengreenfieldfitness.com). Paula Owens is a holistic nutritionist and fitness expert based in Phoenix (paulaowens.com).

Filed under: Lead Story. Tags: , , .

Gearing up and down for the holiday season

December 1st, 2010 - By Jan Jarvis, McClatchy Newspapers

‘Tis the season for racing through the mall, staying up late decorating the tree and spending all weekend baking cookies. But it does not have to be that way.

A simpler holiday season could be in your future. It is possible to slow things down, focus on what matters and toss aside those so-called traditions that have lost their meaning. Instead of ending up exhausted and depressed, you could wake up feeling refreshed and ready to take in all the meaningful moments that this time of the year offers.

Here’s some ways to get you started.

Think happy thoughts

Join the Happiness Project and in no time you’ll be spreading holiday cheer.

Gretchen Rubin spent a year test-driving theories on how to achieve happiness and turned the results into her best-selling book The Happiness Project. You’ll find plenty of info there, but she also has a website packed with inspirational quotes, articles and advice your mother probably never gave you.

Yoga may be better at reducing anxiety and lifting mood than other forms of exercise, study finds

November 28th, 2010 - By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times (MCT)

Yoga has many proven health benefits, but does it stand up to other forms of exercise? Researchers pitted it against a walking routine and found that those who practiced yoga showed greater improvements in mood and anxiety.

Researchers randomly assigned 19 people to an Iyengar yoga program and 15 to a metabolically matched regular walking regimen.

Both groups took part in the programs for an hour three times a week for 12 weeks. Study participants were tested several times to measure mood and anxiety.

Filed under: Mental Health. Tags: , , , .

A heart-healthy lifestyle isn’t so easy, a new study finds

November 27th, 2010 - By Anna Lempereur, Medill News Service

WeirdLookingHeartThingy

Only two of 17,820 participants studied met all seven ideal factors for a heart-healthy lifestyle, according to a study released at last week’s meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago. These factors, which the heart association dubbed “Life’s Simple 7,” are ideal levels of blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, body mass index, (no) smoking, exercise and diet.

Researchers studied nearly 18,000 white and black men and women aged 45 to 98 from 2003 to 2007. They found fewer than 25 percent of them met at least four or more of the seven factors and those who met more standards lived longer. Lynne Braun, member of the heart association’s Chicago board of directors, said the simple 7 program seeks to improve the overall health of all Americans by 20 percent and reduce the number of deaths from heart disease and stroke by 20 percent by the year 2020.

Filed under: Lead Story. Tags: , , .

Tips to stay fit in the cold

November 26th, 2010 - By Lauren Everitt, Medill News Service

Exercisers enjoy cool autumn temperatures on Lakefront Trail near Belmont Harbor. (Photograph by Lauren Everitt/Medill.)

Exercisers enjoy cool autumn temperatures on Lakefront Trail near Belmont Harbor. (Photograph by Lauren Everitt/Medill.)

Autumn brings golden leaves, cooler temperatures and an excellent opportunity for outdoor activity. But when cool weather turns to cold, exercisers should heed some simple advice to avoid injury. Experts Sergio Rojas, a Chicago-based celebrity trainer and former executive director of the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, and Erik VanIterson, an exercise physiologist with the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, provide tips on how to stay safe and active when the mercury drops.

Filed under: Fitness. Tags: .

Best diabetes fitness plan—Aerobics plus weights

November 24th, 2010 - By Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer

Deidra Atkins-Ball, 44, walks in Forest Park Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010, in Baton Rouge, La. Atkins-Ball has diabetes and took part in a study where she was in a nine-month fitness program combining aerobics and weight training. She successfully lowered her blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should mix aerobics with weight training to get the best results in lowering blood sugar, a new study suggests. The combination worked best for weight loss too, compared to aerobics or weight training alone. Blood sugar is fuel to muscles, and more sugar is burned during aerobic activity. Weight training builds more muscle, and both activities change muscle proteins in ways that enhance the process. (AP Photo/Bill Feig)

Deidra Atkins-Ball, 44, walks in Forest Park Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2010, in Baton Rouge, La. Atkins-Ball has diabetes and took part in a study where she was in a nine-month fitness program combining aerobics and weight training. She successfully lowered her blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should mix aerobics with weight training to get the best results in lowering blood sugar, a new study suggests. The combination worked best for weight loss too, compared to aerobics or weight training alone. Blood sugar is fuel to muscles, and more sugar is burned during aerobic activity. Weight training builds more muscle, and both activities change muscle proteins in ways that enhance the process. (AP Photo/Bill Feig)

People with diabetes should mix aerobics with weight training to get the best results in lowering blood sugar, a new study suggests. The combination worked best for weight loss too, compared to aerobics or weight training alone.

Blood sugar is fuel to muscles, and more sugar is burned during aerobic activity. Weight training builds more muscle, and both activities change muscle proteins in ways that enhance the process.

“It’s clear that doing both aerobic and strength training is superior to either alone,” said lead author Dr. Tim Church of Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. “It’s almost like taking two different drugs.”

Filed under: Fitness. Tags: , .

Give the gift of fitness

November 18th, 2010 - By Taniesha Robinson, CTW Features

Kinect for Xbox 360

Kinect for Xbox 360

Video-gaming couch potatoes are so yesteryear. In 2010, gamers must get on their feet to conquer feats in seventh-generation gaming systems. Two new consoles debuted this year with action-packed adventures for all ages to enjoy. Gift-givers, compare specs below to decide which gaming system will help loved-ones make all the right moves.

Filed under: Fitness. Tags: , .

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