NWI Parent

Health & Wellness

Book chronicles Merrillville family’s journey with autism

December 10th, 2010 - By Carrie Rodovich

whataboutpaul

When Jad Terrebonne’s son, Paul, was diagnosed with autism more than two decades ago, he felt like someone had taken a hammer and shattered all his dreams.

“It was a shock to us,” he said. “I grew up in a ‘boys world’ and had that dream of hunting and fishing with him, like I did with my father. I really struggled with that for a long time.”

Jad Terrebonne recently self–published What About Paul? How I Gave Up My Broken Dreams detailing his family’s journey with Paul, now 27. Terrebonne’s wife, Rachelle, and his daughter, Amy Terrebonne Luarca, also contributed chapters to the book.The book is available through amazon.com.

After the initial surprise of Paul’s diagnosis wore off, Terrebonne said the family made it a priority to help Paul get all the services he needed. “I said I was going to fight to see that he could reach all of his potential,” he said.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Food choices can affect antibiotic’s effectiveness

November 29th, 2010 - By Julie Deardorff, Chicago Tribune (MCT)

When your child needs antibiotics, dietary choices can get complicated.

Food can help support the body nutritionally and hinder the effectiveness of the medication, depending on what your child eats and when.

Antibiotics kill the nasty bacteria that cause the illness but also can wipe out the beneficial microbes that the body needs to absorb key nutrients, including several B vitamins and vitamin K.

Experts say it’s important to replace the lost nutrients, either through a multivitamin or by eating foods rich in the depleted vitamins, such as leafy green veggies. At the same time, food and supplements can increase, reduce or delay how a drug is absorbed.

To get the most out of the medicine, make sure your child takes the full dosage and read the package insert. Always check with your pharmacist for each specific medication.

Also: Make sure she really needs antibiotics. Antibiotics cure bacterial infections—which means they are useless against viral infections such as colds or flu, most coughs, bronchitis, runny noses and sore throats not caused by strep.

Art Smith, Elmo team up to cook up good nutrition

November 29th, 2010 - By Michelle Locke, for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Sesame Workshop/Richard Termine shows <em>Sesame Street</em> characters Elmo, second from right, and Super Grover, right, as they pose with four new Muppets representing healthy food groups; fruits, vegetables, dairy, and grains as part of their “Food For Thought: Eating Well on a Budget” initiative in New York. The program is aimed at the 15 percent of households in the U.S.—accounting for approximately 9 million children—who don't get food that meets basic nutritional needs due to financial instability. (AP Photo/Sesame Workshop, Richard Termine)

This undated photo courtesy of Sesame Workshop/Richard Termine shows Sesame Street characters Elmo, second from right, and Super Grover, right, as they pose with four new Muppets representing healthy food groups; fruits, vegetables, dairy, and grains as part of their “Food For Thought: Eating Well on a Budget” initiative in New York. The program is aimed at the 15 percent of households in the U.S.—accounting for approximately 9 million children—who don't get food that meets basic nutritional needs due to financial instability. (AP Photo/Sesame Workshop, Richard Termine)

“C” is for cookie. And “N” is for nutrition.

The folks at Sesame Street are hoping to spell out a message of eating well with a new initiative aimed at fighting hunger.

The program, “Food for Thought: Eating Well on a Budget,” is being put together by Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street. It’s aimed at the 15 percent of households in the U.S—accounting for approximately 9 million children—who don’t get food that meets basic nutritional needs due to financial instability.

In search of a solution to teen pregnancy

November 27th, 2010 - By Melissa M. Scallan, The Sun Herald

Charleena Rogers got pregnant in May 2009 but didn’t tell anyone until she visited her mother in California at Christmas that year, and her mother figured it out.

She had no prenatal care for the first seven months of her pregnancy.

Now 16, Rogers has a 9-month-old daughter. She is trying to take care of her baby, keep up with her classes at Gautier High School and spend some time with her friends when she can.

“It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do in my life,” she said.

State health officials urge families to get pertussis vaccine

November 26th, 2010 - By Times Staff, nwi.com

The state is experiencing its largest outbreak of pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, since 1959.

So far, more than 500 cases have been reported, including two infant deaths.

Pertussis is a contagious illness caused by bacteria. It may cause severe coughing fits that can interfere with breathing. Although pertussis is often milder in older children and adults, undiagnosed people can transmit the disease to infants and young children. Pertussis can lead to pneumonia, seizures and sometimes death.

How to avoid childhood allergies

November 22nd, 2010 - By Alison Johnson, Daily Press (Newport News, Va.) (MCT)

Many cases of food allergies and eczema—a skin condition marked by itchy rashes—are unavoidable. But dermatologists say these steps may help reduce your child’s risks:

Consider your pregnancy diet. Babies whose mothers eat peanuts are more likely to test positive for peanut allergies, and the same may be true for eggs and egg allergies, according to a recently published article in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. However, previous studies have had conflicting results. Talk to your doctor.

US survey: 1 in 10 kids has ADHD, awareness cited

November 20th, 2010 - By Associated Press

A government survey says 1 in 10 U.S. children has ADHD, a sizable increase from a few years earlier that researchers think might be explained by growing awareness and better screening.

ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, makes it hard for kids to pay attention and control impulsive behavior. It’s often treated with drugs, behavioral therapy, or both.

The new study found that about two-thirds of the children who have ADHD are on medication.

Holiday Happenings

November 17th, 2010 - By NWI Parent Staff

Through Jan 2 Winter Pageant, Redmoon Central, 1463 W Hubbard St, Chicago. 312.850.8440. redmoon.org. The 16th annual Winter Pageant features puppetry, gadgets, a host of hilarious characters and a great soundtrack straight from the 1960s to help families celebrate the changing of the seasons and look forward to the coming of spring.

Through Jan 9 Christmas around the World and Holidays of Light, Museum of Science and Industry, 57th St & Lake Shore Dr, Chicago. 773.684.1414. msichicago.org. A grand 45-foot Christmas tree will take center stage in the museum’s Rotunda and more than 50 other trees will be decorated to represent cultures from around the world. Dance and choral groups will perform on the Holiday Stage and “snow” will fall on visitors as they walk along the decked halls.

Through Jan 9 A Christmas Story Comes Home, South Shore Convention and Visitors Authority, 7770 Corinne Dr, Hammond. 219.989.7979. achristmasstorycomeshome.com. Six animated displays depicting scenes from A Christmas Story will be showcased at the South Shore Convention and Visitors Authority. The scenes, which debuted in the windows of Macy’s in New York City, feature some of the beloved characters and locations of the movie. In addition to viewing the displays, kids can also participate in various events throughout the season, including the “Mommy’s Little Piggy” eating contest, “Oh Fuuudge!” relay race and photos with Santa atop “Santa’s Mountain” before sliding to the ground just like Ralphie does in the film.

Hopkins study looks into fitness guidelines for pregnant women

November 15th, 2010 - By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun (MCT)

Meredith Dobrosielski, 36, exercises on a treadmill in Dr. Andrew Satin's lab as part of a health study about pregnant women and the effects of exercise. (Photograph by Algerina Perna/Baltimore Sun.)

Meredith Dobrosielski, 36, exercises on a treadmill in Dr. Andrew Satin's lab as part of a health study about pregnant women and the effects of exercise.
(Photograph by Algerina Perna/Baltimore Sun.)

Her Asics laced up and her water bottle at her side, Meredith Dobrosielski stepped onto the treadmill for a robust half-hour walk.

For the Towson, Md., runner, this wasn’t just any trip to the gym. The session took place in a lab at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore. And each step offered information on the impact of exercise on her fetus. Dobrosielski is about 8 months’ pregnant.

Doctors expect the information collected to fill in some gaps in the data on how much pounding is OK for a developing baby. Eventually, they hope to be able to develop personalized workout schedules for women in different states of fitness.

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