NWI Parent

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.

Kid Picks with Philip Potempa

December 2nd, 2010 - By Philip Potempa

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Here’s our weekly showcase of the latest and greatest new selections in media for youth.

From books and games to educational toys and DVDs, there’s never a dull moment for active and eager young minds.

This week, robots, dinosaurs and dragons populate the pages of three new hardcover books sure to stimulate young minds and creative imaginations.

BOOKS

AGES 8 AND UP

The Robot Book
by Heather Brown (Accord Publishing, $16.99)

Best described as an interactive story, this clever 12-page book uses the true and original 3D design. It features real cardboard twisting and turning gears that spin page by page without any buttons or batteries. From cogs to nuts and bolts, young readers are given a visual sense of the working mechanics for machinery in the guise of a robot. Best of all, the book also emphasizes the most important part of any project found ticking away inside, front and center. It’s available in stores now.

Filed under: Entertainment.

FEATURED THIS WEEK—What’s new on nwi.com/parent

Father Knows Nothing—The Great Glasses Caper

December 6th, 2010 - By Rick Kaempfer

NWI Parent Blog—Rick Kaempfer’s business card says author/writer/blogger, but his real job is “stay-at-home-dad.”

My middle son Johnny doesn’t need to wear his glasses all the time, so I didn’t even notice that he hadn’t worn them for several weeks. I only found out because I received an e-mail from my brother telling me that he had found Johnny’s glasses in his basement.

In Detroit. (Johnny had visited him there about a month ago.)

Continue reading Rick’s latest post here on his “Father Knows Nothing” blog.

Nuts!

December 6th, 2010 - By John Quinlan, Sioux City Journal

Ashton Verdoorn was born in Green Bay, Wis., home of the Packers. The budding football star’s favorite player? Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, the Packers’ arch-rivals. Yet it all makes sense for the 8-year-old who moved to Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, four years ago with his single mom and two sisters.

Packer country is behind him. He only wishes he could have left behind his health woes.

Ashton’s young body, pummeled by a myriad of food allergies, asthma and eczema, makes eating anything new a physical challenge. Nuts and peanuts? Not on the menu. Milk and dairy products? Once verboten but now allowed in modest amounts.

Family overcomes tragedy with a lesson in giving

December 6th, 2010 - By Jo Ann Bobby-Gilbert, Morning Journal News

Maternal love knows no boundaries, and for local mother Kim Bailey that love is now international.

In June, Bailey and her husband, Tom, lost their 2-year-old son in a drowning accident at their home. While coping with Joey’s death as much as possible over the last few months, she and her mother Barb Durst knew the upcoming holidays and his birthday would be especially difficult.

They had been thinking of ways to help them get through those days when Durst heard an announcement on a Christian radio station about Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritan’s Purse that provides gifts to underprivileged children around the world.

Trendy toys don’t stand up to Sixfinger, playthings of yore

December 5th, 2010 - By John Kass, Chicago Tribune

Whatever the hot toy is this year, you can rest assured it is not a Sixfinger.

The Sixfinger was the must-have item when I was a little boy. It was a devilishly clever plastic index finger that was actually a gun. It fired hard plastic objects and exploding projectiles.

You were supposed to shoot these off in the safety of a vacant lot. But it was even more satisfying to point your Sixfinger at the small of your little brother’s back and squeeze off a round, just as he ran off to tell mom and dad you’d pinged Mrs. Molaitis’ basement window.

5 fresh and simple gifts to make by hand

December 5th, 2010 - By Jennifer Forker for the Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

This undated photo courtesy of Kim Mason and Christina Guerrero shows a handmade “sleeve” being used on an Amazon Kindle device. Mason and Guerrero, of Philadelphia, are architects who sell these colorful “sleeves” for high-tech toys from their Etsy shop, Rogue Theory. (AP Photo/Kim Mason) Copyright 2010, The Associated Press

Sometimes, a new twist on an old idea is all it takes and a beautiful handmade gift is born.

If you’re inclined toward making your own gifts this holiday season, look in on the following five ideas, which stand out for their simplicity and freshness.

Objections to international adoptions aren’t about crossing miles, but crossing cultures

December 4th, 2010 - By Young Lee, Medill News Service

When celebrities like Madonna and Angelina Jolie adopt children from foreign countries, the media coverage is intense. But for non-celebrities, who conduct such adoptions without the media glare, the process of the adoptions themselves and the fate of the children once they grow up never are examined.

For Beth Evans, 27, trips to Disneyland every year, birthday parties and holiday dinners may not have happened if she had not been adopted from Korea by her parents, Robert and Louise Evans. Evans was 2 years old when she was adopted from the Sung Lo Won orphanage in Seoul and brought to Grand Rapids, Mich.

Food with a Dash of Fun—One Pan Dinner: Roasted Salmon

December 3rd, 2010 - By Barb Ruess

NWI Parent Blog—We’ve all gotta eat-might as well have some fun in the kitchen! Check here for recipes, cooking with kids, food finds, and more.

Fish was on the menu last night – salmon is a family favorite so I started digging through my files and torn magazine pages to see if I could find a new roasting recipe. Roasting salmon is one of my favorite ways to cook it. It a healthy way to cook and always comes out with a nice clean taste; it’s simple to do; and surrounded by veggies it’s a one pan dinner which is a nice bonus at clean-up time. I found this recipe torn out of a Real Simple magazine. Tweaked it just a tiny bit for my crowd and it’s a new addition to my roasted salmon rotation. Enjoy!

Continue reading Barb’s latest post here on her “Food with a Dash of Fun” blog.

Kids’ Krafts—Hanukkah craft honors Maccabees’ triumph

December 3rd, 2010 - By Kathy Antoniotti, Akron Beacon Journal

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah. (Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

A traditional gelt bag is a poplar gift for children for Hanukkah.
(Photograph by Mike Cardew/Akron Beacon Journal.)

Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of the Lights, began at sundown Wednesday and ends December 9. The eight-day celebration stems from an event that occurred more than 2,300 years ago in Jerusalem.

Hanukkah commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in the second century B.C., after the Jewish people were driven out by Syrian King Antiochus, who outlawed the Jewish religion. He ordered all the Jewish people in Judea, now called Israel, to give up their beliefs and religious customs and worship Greek gods.